News

#Bewareofburns – New safety promotion partnership could significantly reduce burn injuries

Buy Wise Be Safe (BWBS) and University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust (UH Bristol) have got together to form a new partnership which is set to address ways in which families can stay safe by making simple changes to their routine and environment, to prevent accidents from happening.

To launch the partnership, BWBS and UH Bristol will be promoting a safety campaign, focused on burns caused by heated beauty products including straighteners and hot brushes. #Bewareofburns will go live on Monday 5 June, which will coincide with Child Safety Week (5 – 11 June). Information and advice will be available online for parents and carers to access, with tips on how to safely use heated beauty products, what safety features to look for when buying these items and what to do in an event when someone gets burnt.

Recent statistics from Bristol Royal Hospital for Children shows a staggering 90 per cent of children admitted with burns from hair straighteners were under the age of five. The data also found there wasn’t a difference in the number of boys and girls burnt.

Mr Jonathon Pleat, burns lead at Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, said: “We are delighted to be working alongside Buy Wise Be Safe, to promote safety and to try and prevent accidents from happening.

“Although this campaign is targeted at parents and carers of children under the age of five, we are hopeful this information and guidance is of use to anyone using heated beauty products, to protect themselves from being burnt or injured.

“We see children from across the South West and Wales with burn injuries and treat them with the skilled team in our national burns centre. However, we want to prevent as many of these cases as possible from occurring through simple measures that can reduce the risk dramatically.

“A child’s skin is much more fragile than an adult.  It only takes a second at the temperature which some of these devices reach to cause permanent scarring. In some cases, burns may appear in more than one place as a result of grabbing or stepping on the heated blade surfaces.   The risk is greatly reduced if items such as tongs or hair straighteners are placed out the reach of children or put in the supplied protective covers while the surfaces are hot.  Further, it is vital to purchase devices with safety features that can reduce the risk – for example, some have a timer that automatically turns the power off after a certain amount of time.

“These burns are all the more tragic because typically they affect the very young, the effects can be life-long and they are entirely preventable.”

Stuart Radnedge, spokesman for Buy Wise Be Safe, said: “Over the last year the National Trading Standards Safety at Ports and Borders Teams have detained a number of consignments of electrical beauty products such as hair straighteners and hot brushes. Following testing these products have been found to not comply with standards required by UK and EU law and have therefore been destroyed.

“While National Trading Standards is working hard to prevent unsafe goods reaching consumers we would always recommend that people undertake basic checks when buying online, to ensure they are buying from a reputable seller. Our general rule of thumb is if an online deal looks too good to be true then it probably is.

“It’s not just cheap or knock-off goods that pose a threat to consumers. Any item that heats up has the potential to scald or burn someone. Sadly, with straighteners and tongs reaching temperatures of 230°C, these items can remain hot long after use, which is why it is important to stow them safely and look for safety features that can reduce the likelihood of being burnt.

“Thankfully with our new partnership with UH Bristol, even more parents and carers of under 5s should receive superb safety advice that will help keep youngsters safe from harm around the home.”

Visit www.buywisebesafe.org.uk for the website, www.facebook.com/buywisebesafe for the Facebook page, and www.twitter.com/buywisebesafe for the Twitter page.

Buy Wise Be Safe asks, is your home Spring Safe?

An organisation, that aims to reduce injuries to babies and young children around the home, launches its Spring Safety campaign this week.

For four-days, before the Easter bank holiday weekend, Buy Wise Be Safe is asking parents or carers of children aged under 5 if their homes are Spring Safe?

Spring is the season that sees gardens regain colour as the winter gloom lifts and people go back to enjoying the great outdoors. However, the rise in popularity of another type of spring found in many gardens is causing concern.

Over the last two years there has been a boom in the popularity of trampoline parks – with latest statistics indicating there are over 100 in operation around the UK. While hundreds of thousands of people have visited these parks and enjoyed themselves, some have required a visit to A&E as a result of accidents at these centres – some of which have been very serious.

Buy Wise Be Safe is launching the Spring Safety campaign as a way of getting responsible parents and carers of under 5s to make their garden, as well as the inside of their homes, as safe as can be.

“Our advice is that the under 5s shouldn’t be on, or anywhere near, a trampoline at home or at any of these bouncing centres as a child in this age group will not have developed the spatial awareness or coordination required to make it safe for them to be there,” said BWBS spokesman, Stuart Radnedge.

“Trampolines are not the only potential hazard to young children around the garden highlighted by the Spring Safety campaign either. There are all sorts of safety tips – including advice about how you can make sure an Easter Egg Hunt doesn’t result in a trip to hospital.”

“Utilising our advice, provided by leading safety experts from all over the South West, can help ensure you have a fun and safe time at home over the Easter Bank Holiday weekend.”

Visit www.buywisebesafe.org.uk or our social media channels located at www.facebook.com/buywisebesafe or www.twitter.com/buywisebesafe for the #Springsafety campaign advice.

Are you ready for the new Child Car Seat laws?

The law regarding booster seats for children changes on March 1st 2017. Under new EU wide regulations, manufacturers are not allowed to introduce new models of backless booster seats for children weighing less than 22kg or shorter than 125cm.

These seats are unsuitable for small children and offer limited protection in the event of a collision because the child is not held securely by the adult seatbelt across their body. New models of backless booster cushions must be clearly labelled as only suitable for children over 125cm in height and 22kg in weight. The new rules don’t affect existing models of seats or cushions and it doesn’t mean that they are illegal so parents who already own and use backless boosters will still be permitted to use them.

However 66% of parents with children under the age of 12 do not know the current laws about child car seats and these changes may encourage parents to consider checking how their child travels.

The alternative is a high backed booster seat for children aged 4-12 (group2/3) that offer a safer alternative to a backless booster seat until your child reaches 125cm tall or 22kg.

Disturbingly industry safety tests show 8 out of 10 parents install child car seats incorrectly, when using a seat belt while 94% of parents use ISOFIX correctly. There are two standards for choosing a child car seat: the newer i-Size standard, based on height, and the older ECE R 44/04 standard, based on weight.

The law still requires all children less than 12 years old or under 135cm tall (whichever is first) to be carried in size appropriate restraints. Children over 12 or more than 135cm tall must wear an adult seat belt, according to the new rules. Non-compliant drivers face a fixed £30 penalty or fine of up to £500.

Co-op chocolate bunnies recalled as they could pose burn and choking risk

Chocolate Easter bunnies are being recalled by the Co-op – as they could cause internal burns or choking.

It has been alleged that a tampering incident in Nottingham could have taken place after a small battery was discovered inside one of the foil-wrapped chocolate treats.

The Co-op says that just over 3,000 units of the product have been sold nationwide and the company has clarified that no other products are affected.

The National Crime Agency, which deals with food tampering incidents, and police forces are helping with the investigation, which is a criminal matter. The Food Standards Agency has been notified and is assisting.

A spokesperson for the Co-op said, “The health and safety of our customers is uppermost in our minds. We are concerned about one incident of alleged product tampering involving our hollow milk chocolate Easter bunny foil figure, which has been found to contain a small battery inside.”

“This follows an incident at Christmas when two similar products were targeted and contaminated. As a precaution, we have begun a UK-wide product recall and have withdrawn the product from sale.”

Customers with one of these products should not eat it but take the product back to store for a full refund. Anyone who is concerned should call Co-op customer services on Freephone 0800 0686 727.

At the end of last year, as part of the #12daysofsafety campaign, Buy Wise Be Safe highlighted the risk smaller batteries, like button batteries, pose to young children. Once swallowed, within minutes, internal burns can occur or a child could choke as the battery blocks their airways.

To remind yourself about how to make your home as safe as possible for your child, be sure to reread the advice we gave in the #12daysofsafety campaign in December 2016.

Range of toys recall prompts ‘regular maintenance’ advice

A range of wooden toys produced by a popular children’s toy supplier have been recalled.

Following customer feedback the toys from the Early Learning Centre (ELC), which is part of the Mothercare Group, that are involved in the recall are listed below.

The advice for customers is to check the tightness of the wheel screws of the following items;

ELC wooden pushchair (SKU: 141014)

ELC wooden workbench (SKU 141013)

ELC wooden toddler truck (SKU 141208)

ELC wooden toddler truck – pink (SKU 141209)

A company statement says, “As part pf your regular product maintenance, pleasure ensure that you regularly check the tightness of all fittings to prevent them from coming loose.”

ELC customer services can be contacted on 0371 231 3513. Lines are open from 8am to 8pm Monday to Friday, 9am to 6pm Saturday and 9am to 5pm on Sundays and cost no more than a national standard rate call.

Regular safety checks of all the toys your child plays with is something that Buy Wise Be Safe promotes. Please visit the various sections around our website to see all of the safety advice we offer.

 

Bespoke bed manufacturer offers safety advice

Craig Williams and Playtime Beds Ltd of Sheffield are issuing an important safety warning for bespoke products made and supplied nationally, since approximately 2011, due to potential safety risks arising from their design, manufacture and erection, in particular, safety risks to children.

This warning comes after a seven-month-old died at a house in York on November 3, which has prompted the company to issue a product warning and work with the police and Trading Standards which are carrying out a joint investigation into the issue.

Children’s cots, beds, twin beds, cot bunk beds, bunk beds, cabin beds, high sleeper beds and triple and quadruple beds which have all been made by either Playtime Beds or Craig Williams are currently involved in the safety advice warning issued, which states that the products could lead to asphyxiation or strangulation, falling, entrapment or crushing of a child.

Sheffield Trading Standards would urge anyone who has purchased any of the above products to call the national Citizens Advice Bureau helpline on 03454 040506 who can pass on details to enable local Trading Standards to contact customers to assess whether their products may or may not be at risk.

Craig Williams and Playtime beds Ltd would strongly advise that until such time that they are able to determine which bed and extras you purchased, you stop using the bed immediately either for sleep or play, and ensure that children in particular do not climb, sleep in it or play in or on it.

Playtime Beds Ltd have currently ceased trading but are working with Sheffield City Council’s Trading Standards Department regarding safety concerns in relation to various hazards, associated with particular bespoke products, that the business has manufactured and supplied. Products have been supplied by PlayTime Beds Limited since the company formation in March 2015 and before this time by Mr Craig Williams trading as Playtime Beds using Facebook and eBay since approximately 2011.

Day twelve advice for #12daysofsafety Christmas campaign

Sadly, today is the final day of our advice and we hope you have all found it useful! Around Christmas our statistics show that falls cause the most injuries. Supervising your young child wherever he or she may be would prevent these incidents and injuries from occurring, but our guidance below will also aim to help you achieve this.

  • If you are visiting family or friends, be sure to check their houses for any dangers that may cause injuries to your child. Look out for clutter, specifically around the stairs, and ask that rooms are well lit to avoid slips, trips and falls.
  • If your child is old enough to understand, educate them about what they can or can’t do around someone else’s home. Tell them the stairs are out of bounds and not to climb on, and jump off, furniture.
  • If you have smaller children, remember to not change them on elevated surfaces. Do not place them in a car seat or carrier on a table, as if it is knocked off in error this could injure your child.
  • Don’t be too afraid of getting down on your hands and knees and having a look around the home you are visiting to see things from your child’s perspective! This will help you understand any hidden dangers that may be around.
  • Above all, supervision is key! Different surroundings will likely make your child want to explore. With hot food possibly being made and maybe alcohol being consumed by you or others, the risk of injury increases. If people have had a drink or two, try to encourage them not to pick up or pass around your small child.

Above all, stay safe and have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from all at Buy Wise Be Safe.

Day eleven advice for #12daysofsafety Christmas campaign

About six weeks ago we warned about the dangers that can be installed around your home in the name of Halloween. The same advice can be applied to Christmas as shops stock various fancy dress options for young children and candles can be lit around the home – particularly as part of the Advent Wreath.

  • Before you purchase any fancy dress items, make sure you have read our Halloween advice here and watched our safety video that we shared on facebook.com/buywisebesafe With some children’s fancy dress costumes, it takes less than a moment to catch alight!
  • Never leave burning candles unattended, and make sure you have extinguished all that were lit before you go to bed. Never place candles under your tree or on it, or under other decorations.

With the amount of hot ovens, food, drinks, and other heat sources that are around the home during Christmas it can be a good idea to refresh your knowledge of burns treatment. In cases of emergency cool the burn with running cold tap water for 20 minutes and remove all clothing and jewellery in the area. Call for help. Dial 999. 111 or a local GP for advice. Finally cover with cling film or a sterile, non-fluffy, dressing or cloth. Also make sure the person is kept warm.

Day ten advice for #12daysofsafety

Despite being Winter, the chance of your child getting burned is incredibly high if you do not take precautions. The kitchen is a hive of activity during Christmas with ovens always seeming to be cooking something, and pans of water boiling for hours on end as Christmas puddings are steamed to perfection. While it may be obvious to some, keep your young children out of the kitchen!

  • Keep little ones out of the kitchen while Christmas dinner is being cooked to avoid hot fat, boiling water and sharp knives! Also, when it comes to serving the food, remember to not pass hot food around the dinner table as it could fall out of your hand and badly burn your child.
  • Check out our sections on this site regarding burns as a lot of the information we have provided about hot drinks, food and cooking applies to this time of the year.
  • If you’re straightening your hair, or have a hairdryer on, be sure to place them somewhere that is out of reach for your child. Straighteners heat to 230°c and can take up to 30 minutes to cool down.

Remember, a child aged 0-5 has skin that is 15 times thinner than that of an adult. Encourage them to learn that the kitchen, when someone is cooking, is not a place they should be!

Day nine advice for #12daysofsafety

In yesterday’s advice we warned about the dangers of buying counterfeit chargers and electrical devices, as these fakes are usually cheaper as they don’t have the expensive components that protect you and your home. But is there any danger in buying cheap, or faked, toys – like dolls of Elsa from Frozen?

Quite simply, don’t buy the cheaper versions. A study from trading standards officers, from all over the nation, involved the testing of dolls earlier this year. The tests found high levels of nasty chemicals that shouldn’t belong in children’s toys.

  • Cheap toys are not made to the same strict standards that official products from the movies/television shows are.
  • Respect the age limits placed on toys. They are there for a very good reason and have been tested by experts. A toy that says it is not for the use of anyone under the age of 3 could mean that small parts pose a threat to your child’s wellbeing if they were to swallow or choke on them. Supervision of your child is vital when playing with a new toy.
  • Beware of choking hazards to young children around your home at Christmas. This can be anything such as burst balloons, small toy parts and tree decorations.

 

Finally, when buying gifts for your children don’t be afraid of opening boxes to make sure there are no small parts that can be removed by them.