Fresh warnings made after two-year-old dies from swallowing button battery

Fresh advice has been issued by NHS Chiefs following the death of a two-year-old girl who swallowed a button battery over the Christmas period.
Brianna Florer died days after swallowing a lithium battery at her home in Tulsa, Oklahoma, with the sad news prompting NHS professionals to reissue advice on how you can keep your child safe.
Button batteries are the small, round, silver-coloured lithium batteries used in many electrical toys.
The NHS advises anyone who believes their child may have swallowed one to take them to A&E immediately, saying that as well as being a choking hazard, the electrical current the batteries give out can cause burns if they become stuck.
An alert issued by NHS England said caustic soda created by the current can cause “severe tissue damage”, leading to burns, skin damage and “catastrophic haemorrhage”.
In the four years leading up to 2014, five cases of severe injury caused by button batteries had been identified in England, including one resulting in a child’s death.
“The risk affects all age groups, although most cases involve children under the age of six who mistake the battery for a sweet and older people with confusion or poor vision who mistake the battery for a pill,” an NHS spokesperson said.
Dr. Mike Durkin, the NHS England Director of Patient Safety, released a warning to GPs and hospitals to ensure they were aware of the symptoms.
He said, “As these types of batteries are common in toys and gadgets that may be given as presents, the risk of children swallowing them increases during the Christmas period.”